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20131201
20131231
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ALJAZAM 194
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 198 (some duplicates have been removed)
'm ray suarez, and that's the "inside story." >> five million americans suffer from alzheimer's disease. >> five million americans suffer from alzheimer's disease, and by 1950 that number will double. we'll discuss the national plan to address alzheimer's disease, and focus on newly funded research testing new drugs. here is the interesting part. the drugs will be used preventively on healthy people genetically predisposed developing the disease. we will start our discussion in a moment, but here is the background. >> what i noticed four or five years ago was my difficulty in writing complex topics. i could not hold all of them in my mind, so it became much more difficult and frustrating to write about those things. >> david is a doctor, teacher, and an individual blogger. these days he's writing about a topic that hits close to home. >> what i'm trying to do is to take my family and my community with me into this journey so i don't get isolated as much. >> the alzheimer's association said there are five million who suffer from alzheimer's and it's the sixth leading cause of death in th
. >> i'm ray suarez. this is "inside story." we're talking about the minimum wage and mark, i'm wondering with so many low wage workers working for very successful companies we've seen that many of their intake procedures involve advising their own workers on how to take advantage of federal and state benefits for low-wage people. as a taxpayer and a customer, am i better off paying my tax money to give those people benefits like snap, or am i better off paying a little extra so they're not poor any more. >> you're probably better off paying a little extra so they're not poor any more. if you look at the dead weight loss as economists look at it with the transfer of your money through the federal government and then back through the social service programs that a lot of minimum wage workers are available for, there is loss added to that through the transaction. you're probably better off paying a little bit more. but again that's the cost. the minimum wage, increase in minimum wage is a political argument. it's never been an economic argument. people should be aware that there is a cost a
the minimum wage is the inside story. >> hello, i'm ray suarez. the wheels of the american economy turned with the labor of low wage workers across this country. the dishwashers, retail sales people and healthcare providers who toil at the federal minimum wage haven't seen a pay raise in four years and efforts in congress to find one have stagnated. cities, states, and counties are taking it on themselves to bring their workers to income levels closer to the fiscal realities of these tough times. and it's no easy task. as much debate surrounds the effectiveness of image wage hikes and who really benefits. do these wage controls cost jobs? we'll discuss the issue on this addition of "inside story." but first this background. >> they deserve to live a good life in one of the richest cities in the world. >> reporter: close to 100 people rallied outside washington, d.c. city council chamber as council members inside voted to raise the city's minimum wage to $11.50 an hour. >> congress' failure to act, and congress' failure to take care of those left behind not just from the recession, but as
, i'm ray suarez. we didn't look ahead to 2013 on this program a year ago. because this network wasn't on the air and i was working somewhere else. if we had, we never would have predicted the year that followed. barack obama after a convincing win the previous november took the oath of office for a second time and then proceeded to have a tough year as president. the affordable care act has dragged the president to the lowest approval levels of his presidency. pope benedict xvi did what popes never did, he resigned before dieing in office moving the way for new pope francis. the first latin american leader of the church. the market plunged and then soared at the end of the year when the the fed announced a taper. many made headlines in 2013. could you have predicted any of it? let's take a quick look back at a year about to end. >> obama: you and i as citizens have the power to set this country's course. you and i as citizens have the obligation to shape the debates of our time. [ cheering ] >> the taliban shot me on the left side of my forehead. they thought the bullet would sal le
and challenges remain. i'm ray sa suarez and that's the "inside story." ♪ >> president obama says the healthcare.gov website is significantly improved. the administration said the site can now handle 50,000 people at once and 800,000 users a day. that's on the could called front end as people browse the site. but the back end is still a work in progress. that's where the real business is as insurance companies and the federal government share info and you finish your purchase. on this edition of inside story we're going give the affordable care act and online exchanges a checkup with the deadlines approaching fast. the obama administration says the ailing website healthcare.gov is on the mend, and close to being cured of the bugs and glitches that had the president himself apologizing. >> what i'm going to do is make sure that we get it fixed. >> this weekend was president obama's sow-imposed deadline to make the site work. the department of health and human services announced a main online artery for americans to buy health insurance is working 90% of the time. more than 400 bugs in the syste
'm ray suarez. the u.s. house is already home for the holidays, now all eyes are on senate to see this they can pass the budget deal. if they can, it will mark achievement in a year of rankle. on this edition of our program we will an ask a ask what cost is compromise. first this background. the senate is race to go wrap up its work for the year and the pressure is on senators to pass a budget before heading home for the holidays. democrats know they need a handful of republicans to pass the spending plan. some senators indicated they would vote to end debate. >> i hope it will pass the senate. i'll do anything, but not anything but we must not shut down the government again. >> reporter: last week the house passed a 1 trillion-dollar budget that would ease cuts from the sequester and avoid risk ing another government shutdown. >> i'm glad to report that senator murray and i have reached an agreement. >> reporter: months in the making this compromise came together from budget leaders in both chambers. democrats lost the fight on extended long-term unemployment insurance and republ
and the pivot towards asia are the "inside story." >> welcome to "inside story." i'm ray suarez. for more than a months the specific island nation of the philippines have struggled to recover from the worst national disaster that it's ever known. typhoon haiyan. there are still people missing as the storm scoured towns and villages from the land. aid workers will be helping the millions of people who survived but lost homes and shelter for a long time to come. now the united states is promising a new package of military aid to the philippines, $40 million, as geopolitical tensions in the region rise after provocative decisions made by china. we'll get the latest on storm recovery and face off of the south china sea on this edition of "inside story." but first some background. >> secretary of state john kerry traveled to the philippines tuesday. he met with senior filipino officials to discuss trade, security and disaster relief. it is part of the u.s. strategy to pivot towards asia and become closer to its pacific partners. >> the united states will stand with our friends in this region. >> th
." >> hello, i'm ray suarez. turkey and travel go together. this thanksgiving season its estimated 25 million people will be in the air. and according to an airline industry trade group we're all paying less in real dollars than we did in 2000, but you had more options then, too. there has been a string of big mergers and american airlines will finalize a $17 billion deal with u.s. airways making american the largest carrier in the country. before the deal went through the justice department made american open up major hubs to smaller airlines and cut back on routes and a number of flights. on this edition of "inside story" we're going to talk about the mega merger and what it means for the flying public. the merger between american and u.s. airways is a $17 billion deal. the new american will carry 130 million passengers annually. it will operate 6700 flights to 500 destination nationwide. it will allow the new american airlines to become king of the air waives. airwaves. it must give up gates and landing slots in seven major airport including new york, los angeles, and ronald reagan washing
. i'm ray suarez. we're giving the affordable care act and the online enrollment process a checkup. we go to the deputy secretary of u.s. department of health and human services anded a jumping fellow at the hudson institute and author of "what jefferson read, ike watched and obama tweeted: 200 years in the white house." and jodie ray, from the university of south florida, and igor, coauthor of "prescriptions for real healthcare reform." jodie ray, you're helping to guy navigate the insurance. how is it going down there now? >> we've been busy. we've been very busy. we have over 90 navigators on the ground, and we've got a lot of folks scheduling appointments and walking in to get assistance to apply . our navigators have been using all forms of applications to ensure that every consumer that comes in get assisted, but we're seeing more and more of those being done villa the web. in fact, for november, 71% of the applications submitted under our project were done by the web. >> jodie, does the problems with the website end up making the navigators more important? in florida you have a
to inside story. i'm ray suarez. we're talking about the minimum wage and issues that surround raising it. again our guests heidi from the economic policy institute. richard with the campaign for america's future. and mark, former deputy assistance sector employment standards at the u.s. department of labor in the bush administration. mark, is there a balance to be struck here? are there jobs that are, well, vulnerable in this economy any way? perhaps helping 90% of low-wage workers while disadvantaging some works out in the macro-economy even while it's hurting in the near term some of those very low-wage workers we're trying to help. >> yes, there will be workers that will be helped by the increase in minimum wage, that is a certainty. they'll spend almost likely all of the money they get in that wage increase. how difficult it is to ascertain whether the macro-economy will be helped substantially or not because there will be so many things swirling around. potentially increasing interest rates. things that may happen. tax increases, spending increases at the federal level. so many poss
struggle. i'm ray suarez, and that is the inside story. >> the latest trouble in ukraine is brewing for weeks. the crisis approached the breaking point overnight as police moved against the protesters in the ukraine capitol kiev. it was the rejection of a deal for closer economic ties with europe that sent protesters into the streets. it's a high-stakes drama and a flash point of the larger power struggle between russian president putin on one side and the united states and europe on the other. on this edition of our program we're going to dig in to why all this matters for america. but we start on the ground in kiev's independent square. >> for more than two weeks demonstrators have rallied against the government in the ukraine's capitol kiev. in the middle of the night riot police moved into independent square. >> we're standing here, but we're moving. we're moving forward step by step, we're going forward. everyone makes a big effort for our country, for our families, and the whole world is watching ukraine. >> in freezing conditions the police pushed and shoved their way in the
. i'm ray suarez, and that's the "inside story." >> five million americans suffer from alzheimer's disease. by the 2050 that number is expected to double. by that time the cost of treating the disease will hit 1 trillion-dollar. on this edition of inside story we'll discuss the national plan to address alzheimer's disease and focus on newly funded research. the drugs will be used preventively on healthy people genetically pre-deposed to develop the disease. we'll start our discussion in a moment. first this background. >> what i noticed maybe four or five years ago was my difficulty in writing about complex topics. i just couldn't hold all of them at the same time in my mind, so it became much more difficult. and frustrating to try to write about those. >> i think david is a doctor, teacher, and avid blogger. these days he's writing about a topic that hits close to home. >> what i'm trying to do is take my family and my community with me into this journey so that i don't get isolated as much. >> the alzheimer's association said there are 5 million alzheimer's sufferers in the u.s
for the economy in 2014. decoding the just concluded federal reserve meeting is the inside story. ray suarez. what the federal reserve decides has a direct impact on the economy, and your pocketbook and effects felt around the world. since the great recession the federal reserve has taken interest rates to historic lows and used its power to stimulate the economy using quantitative easing. ben bernanke announced the feds will scale back the program next year. we'll decode the fed's actions, look ahead to the tenure of incoming fed chairman janet yellen and look at the recovering economy. >>> the federal reserve wrapped up two days of policy meetings and concluded the u.s. economy is strong enough to start tapering the banks investment program known as qualitative easing. >> starting in january we'll purchasscale back purchases. >> reporter: the positive signs are few but strong. unemployment reached 7% in november. the s&p 500 gained 25% just in the past year. the highest in a decade. and congress passed a budget for the first time in four years. >> today's policy actions reflect the committee's a
the vert liser that number issues the >> welcome back to "inside story." i'm ray suarez. and we're talking about city management and growth in a time of great fiscal limitations. still with us roberta, and mark now president and korea of the urban league, and james brooks, program director of the national league of cities, and david, reporter with wbur. mark, many of the cities that are doing well have become expensive places to live, added a lot of workers to their job rolls, yet we see eve inequality widening. have these cities where there have been a large number of black and brown americans live in them help them move forward as well? >> i think you pointed to one of the new most important challenges that this new generation of mayors are facing. this growing economic divide, the great divide as i call it between haves and have notes in a city. and i think cities have always been places of greatest nic gred backgrounds and economic classes. i think the prospect of the city being the only place of the very rich or the very poor live is not a healthy future for america's urban communiti
on you and the economy coming to life. that's inside story. ♪ >> hello, i'm ray suarez. 2013 will be remembered as a year of partisan dysfunction in wash despite the threat of default and government shutdown the economy has been showing signs of life. unemployment dropped to its lowest level since president obama took office and since the great recession the federal reserve has been using tools in its toolbox to keep the economy on track. interest rates are still at rock bottom, and the fed kept up its bond by bu buying program. that policy has been the signature of outgoing federal chairman ben bernanke. but the fed will begin to ease off the easing under new chair janet yellen. under this new edition, we'll examine the green shoots of a recovering economy. >> reporter: the federal reserve wrapped up two days of policy meetings and concluded the u.s. economy is strong enough to start tapering the banks investment program known as quantitative easing. >> we'll be purchasing $75 billion a month reducing purchasing of treasuries by $5 million each. >> reporter: the positive sig
, i'm ray suarez. woe to the unknowing consumer who wants to wrap up holiday shopping at the big box target target this season. perhaps many of us doing what we do every day have come under threat from a growing crime. account data theft. the sophistication of the criminals far out ways the built in protections from the retailers and creditors who lend us money. one bank's reaction appears nor self-serving than the good of customers, what are you going to do, unless your sure your account information is safe? is cash king after all? we'll talk about all this. but first some background. >> reporter: on the backside of your credit or debit cart i cara black magnetic strip why all your information is stored. the strip is the target of hawkers. security as many as from retailers, banks and credit card companies so consumers have in a sense lots of reasons to trust that their transactions are safe. still the point of sales systems are outdated tired to would-be thieves, and it is expensive for companies to update their systems. and there was a data breach during the heart of the holiday s
's hardly alone in its efforts to solve the burden of runaway debt. i'm ray suarez. bankruptcy lessons learn and the real impact on people's lives. that's the "inside story." >> in the 1950s, a gm ceo famously said what is good for our country is good for general motors, and vice versa. as the auto industry sank it took it's capitol of detroit with it. today the city is shrinking and broke. to solve its financial crisis detroit will have to cut city workers pensions. illinois just pass emergency legislation to tackle $100 billion shortfall in its pension obligations. that's huge money and people will pay the price. on this edition of inside story we'll look at the trade-offs and solutions when balance sheets teeter to the brink of disaster, and we start in detroit. >> let me just say that the judge has spoken, and i do think it's a tough day for all of us here in detroit [♪ music ] >> once the nation's fourth largest city, the heart of the auto industry and the soul of american music today's detroit is a portrait of urban decay and facing a water shed moment. it is the largest municipality
jazeera. >> only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >> welcome back to inside story. i'm ray suarez. we're talking about congress and the to do list this week before it adjourns for the year. we're continuing our conversation with ginger gibson, and dan glickman, and josh withrow. and mr. secretary, as a legislator, you crafted and voted on bills. as a secretary you had people looking over cure shoulder at one of the largest branch departments and then you had business before the congress. had a have you seen in the way that the work is getting done over your career in washington? >> it's certainly slowed down considerably. a lot of stop lights these days. you used to be on a freeway of legislative action. they didn't stop and lurch as much as they do now. a part of this is because of the fiscal problems. we just don't have the resources that we used to have to spend money on projects. but notwithstanding that the projects is way too slow. the public is appropriately concerned and outraged and "b" it, and the public's business is not getting done. that's in nobody's best interest, espec
on "inside story." >> hello, i'm ray suarez. the world said goodbye and thank you to nelson mandela in an emotional memorial service in a stadium in johannesburg. southern africa, home to some of the most important mineral deposits were racked by civil war pitting sides against each other. murdering political opponents at home and in exile. what south africa follow angola and mozambique in civil war with its large population and decades of bitterness, it created the potential of being the most dangerous of all. on this edition of "inside story" we'll be discussing nelson mandela and the process of negotiation that kept south africa from tearing each other apart. dignitaries, family, friends, and south africans of all color, thousands of mourner poured into the soccer stadium to celebrate the life of nelson mandela. >> to the people of south africa, people of every race and every walk of life, the world thanks you for sharing nelson mandela with us. his struggle was your struggle. his triumph was your try you tr. in through speeches both white and black south africans mourned around
russia is the inside story. >> hello, i'm ray suarez. when the soviet union died russia was a mess. it's economy was a mess. the ruble were plunging in value as were numbers and life expectancies. several former sel soviet membes went their own way. fast forward, boris yeltsin is dead, and yeltsine successor vladimir putin has reasserted russia's place in the world. >> russian president vladimir putin had a few surprises up his sleeve thursday as he announced the prisoner releases in his announcement. most notable, mikhail khodorkovsky. he has spent ten year in jail. he was found guilty of tax invasion in 2015 and i am bes embezzlementment in 2010. >> he's citing humanitarian reasons, his mother is ill. i think taking that into circumstances it is possible to make the relative decision. >> reporter: the russian president also announced a new amnesty bill which will free several political prisoners. prisoners not involved in violent crimes, minors, women, small children and first time offenders. the bill will grant release of greenpeace activists involved in an arctic demonstration and
. running cities in the time of austerity. that's the inside story. >> hello, i'm ray suarez. for many american cities the big municipalities for the core of the metropolitan areas it was a rough half century. from the 1950s on many of them watched as people, investment, infrastructure, corporate headquarters all fled to the suburbs or newly zooming cities in the sun belt. the government propped up sagging cities with programs, housing support, transit and educational funding all kinds of taxpayer funded support. as the axis swung to the suburbs resentment of the cities grew and they tumbled into decay and decline. since then many places have started to grow again. many suburbs have long since gun to have the same problems as their urban neighbors. even as economic growth has been uneven, sporadic, many cities are healthier financially than their states, healthier than their federal government. an urban report card on this addition of "inside story" we begin with this background. >> thank you very much. >> some of america's major cities are waving good buy to their veteran mayors this
," state with us. >>> welcome back to "inside story," i'm ray suarez. they are not comfortable with the government surveillance of their phones and internet activity. the big companies know it, and are tightening security, but is there a sense that even if they do, if they put up new walls and barriers that the nsa will just find ways around them and rifle through the data anyway? >> technology by its very nature has the ability to, you know, new level. so you can put up walls, and then there will be new technologies that can pierce those walls or get around them. so i certainly think there are walls that will be put up. and the different companies have put up walls of different so if you think about google and more recently twitter, they have put on technical -- technology called perfect forward secrecy. so the companies themselves haven't completely sort of put up the highest possible walls, because it is expensive. so they are basically checking it out to see how far they can go without having to incur a whole lot of expense. the nsa or the government can always go to other
go to aljazeera.com >> you're watching "inside story." i'm ray suarez. we're talking about the protests in ukraine. the white house strongly condemn the action against demonstrators and urge the country to return to the path of integration. we want to hone in on the story and whether outside pressure --as we heard we have a society divided against ethnic russians, and ethnic ukraine s, mod dennizers versus traditionalists, and those who want to move towards europe while others want to stay in the russian area. >> what we see coming out now not just in the secrets of kiev but across the country, an overwhelming sense of yes, the ukrainian people want the opportunity to have a less corrupt, more democratic society, governed by rules of law moving towards europe. yanukovych himself was preparing his country for that deal with the european union. and many thought he was ready to support the deal with europe. the ukrainians are driving this debate, but the outside world, the united states, europe, they do have influence. and if anyone understands this, it's yanukovych. in 2004 t
ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5pm et / 2pm pt only on al jazeera america >> mexican authorities have tracked down the stolen shipment of radioactive material. the shipment of cobalt 60 e radioactive material that was stolen from a gas station monday, has been found in central mexico about half a mile from the van that was carrying it. the director of mexico's national commission of nuclear security said the thieves were most likely dead or dying from the exposure to the cobalt 60. the radio being a tich material. use for treating cancer was being transported from a hospital for waste disfoes al at the time of the theft. a controversial new plan to create a new city in louisiana is raising questions ... about race and class. the racial makeup of the new city would be dramitcally different with residents being mostly white and affluent. last week, supporters of the plan announced that they collected more than half of the signatures needed ... to let voters decide if they can go forward with the municipal plan. al jazeera's ben lemoine has more. >> jeffrey lee doesn't m
... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story next only on al jazeera america sense of security but today again it reminds us thattÑ >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey. here are today's headlines. a somber anniversary a year ago a gunman killed 20 children and six teachers in newtown, connecticut. >>> china's probe touched down on the moon this morning. it's carrying a solar powered rover called jade rabbit. thank you for watching al jazeera. i'm richelle carey, "inside story" is next. >> new drug trials for alzheimer's disease target people who don't have the disease but as much of a 50% chance of getting it later. i'm ray suarez, and that's the "inside story." >> five million americans suffer from alzheimer's disease. by the 2050 that number is expected to double. by that time the cost of treating the disease will hit
. ray suarez hosts inside story next only on al jazeera america >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey. a story out of south sudan. the country may be on the verge of a full blown civil war. soldiers are mobilizing throughout the country and four u.s. service members were shot as they attempted to evacuate american citizens from that area. >>> before smart phones and social media there was another way to pass the time, cross word puzzles. today marks it's 100th birthday. and it's not about to fall away into history. >> reporter: languages may differ but these little black and white boxes you know what they mean. >> what is that? >> it's a cross word. >> reporter: keeping us from work. confusing us over coffee. the cross word has been causing headaches for exactly 100 years. this is the first ever. it was published in the u.s. but it's author did not copy write it, which for him was a 15 across or major fail in today's language. phil does his with a cup of tea every day. less problem solving and more problem creator. he is an editor, and when it comes to tough clues he
directly @ray suarez news. from washington, i'm ray suarez. >>> welcome to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey. here are the stories we're following for you. a political shakeup in turkey. three cabinet ministers resign. >>> nsa leaker, edward snowden tapes an alternative christmas message for channel 4 in brintan >> and the muslim brotherhood is declared a terrorist group by the interim government. ♪ >>> three cabinet ministers in turkey have resigned and the latestit
cities in the time of austerity. that's the inside story. >> hello, i'm ray suarez. for many american cities the big municipalities for the core of the metropolitan areas it was a rough half century. from the 1950s on many of them
directly @ray suarez news. from washington, i'm ray suarez.
directly @ray suarez news. from washington, i'm ray suarez. ela >> no sign of peace in south sudan. the government says thousands of rebels are about to attack a state capital. the rebels deny the claim. >> you are watching al jazeera live from doha. also coming up: palestine refugees are reported to be starving to death in syria. >> protests in thailand enter their seventh week as political parties scramble to reach a compse
directly @ray suarez news. from washington, i'm ray suarez. >> welcome to al jazeera america. i'm del walters. these are the stories we're following for you. a second bombing in russia in volgograd target again. and in russia security is number one. >>> israel prepares to release a group of palestinian prisoners. >>> and a california family dealing with what could be the last days of life for their daughter. >> there have now been two deadly bombings in two days, in
ray suarez hosts inside story next only on al jazeera america night with the combatants in their training base. >> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. here are today's top stories. target saying hackers have stole debit and credit card information that 40 million customers. it began on november 27, the day before thanksgiving and continued until this past sunday. >> the president of russia saying the nsa surveillance program is needed and necessary to fight terrorism. just yesterday, the white house release in a report that recommends cutting back on that program, scaling it down considerably. >> it took 90 minutes for a jury to convict two men of killing soldier rigs by last may. they hit him with a car, then hacked him to death with a machete. >> they say christmas is best seen through the eyes of our children. one group trying to make those dreams come true with special holiday greeting cars. >> she homes for world peace. she hopes to be in a band. he wants everyone to have clothes and shoes. these are some of the dreams of america's homeless children.
directly @ray suarez news. from washington, i'm ray suarez. >> we can pass those those savings on. >> welcome hugh jackman. >> having low prices drives traffic to our shores. >> please welcome john legend. >> which allow us to lower expenses and lower prices again. >> please welcome tom cruise.
it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america is. >> i'm a police officer. i know in fact i'll end up.marrying an asian girl. i just know that. >> my name is gordon. i'm a white caucasian male. it makes no difference where she's from within the asian subcontinent. >> that was a clip from debbie lum's documentary, seeking asian female, it may be considered a positive, but others say it's not welcome calling it a fetish. how harmful is it for asian americans to deal with this stereotype? >> growing up in the united states or anywhere else in the west, it's really impossible to not encounter someone who has asian fever or yellow fetish. it gets under the skin of us asian women and men. love should not be dependent on the color of your skin. yet some people are honing in on one race over any other races. and also it affects people outside who are not asian women who wonder why asian women in that new study get the most attention online? and so, you know, that's one part of it. >> jenny, you know this must be very conf
ray suarez hosts inside story next only on al jazeera america >> welcome back to al jazeera america. a college degree is often seen as a ticket to a better life. but for many, the cost of a college education is years of seemingly unending debt. a growing number of college presidents are taking home ceo like pay, some topping $1 million a year. whoa. al jazeera's john terrett is here. >> they are pretty jaw-dropping. you are wondering why the cost of the college education is skyrocketing. reason why your college president is taking home a lot of money. 42 presidents of private colleges were paid more than, wait for this, a million bucks a year, that's up from 36 in the previous two years, 2009 and 2010. and this, according to the chronicle of higher education's annual analysis of 500, actually it was more than 500 private colleges, the latest available tax returns that we have that we can say. now the top three earners were these three, robert j. zimmer, he took home $3,358,723.17. he didn't take home that 17 cents, i made that up. >>> joseph bayone, 3,324,864. and the third highest
." >> hello, i'm ray suarez. the world said goodbye and thank you to nelson mandela in an emotional memorial service in a stadium in johannesburg. southern africa, home to some of the most important mineral deposits were racked by civil war pitting sides against each other. murdering political opponents at home and in exile. what south africa follow angola and mozambique in civil war with its large population and decades of bitterness, it created the potential of being the most dangerous of all. on this edition of "inside story" we'll be discussing nelson mandela and the process of negotiation that kept south africa from tearing each other apart. dignitaries, family, friends, and south africans of all color, thousands of mourner poured into the soccer stadium to celebrate the life of nelson mandela. >> to the people of south africa, people of every race and every walk of life, the world thanks you for sharing nelson mandela with us. his struggle was your struggle. his triumph was your try you triumph. in through speeches both white and black south african s mourned around the country togethe
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 198 (some duplicates have been removed)